What They Didn't Teach You in Graduate School
299 Helpful Hints for Success in Your Academic Career
Edition: 2

Illustrated by Matthew Henry Hall
Paper: 978 1 57922 644 2 / $19.95
 
Published: February 2012  

Cloth: 978 1 57922 643 5 / $70.00
 
Published: March 2012  

Lib E-Book: 978 1 57922 645 9 / $70.00  
About Library E-Book

Published: March 2012  

E-Book: 978 1 57922 646 6 / $15.99
 
Published: March 2012  

Publisher: Stylus Publishing
224 pp., 5 1/2" x 8 1/4"
16 illus
• This irreverent, but serious guide to what life in higher education institutions is really like, now enhanced by 100 new tips
• Invaluable advice that ranges from getting your Ph.D. to setting the course of your academic career

The 100 new hints expand sections on the dissertation process, job hunting, life in the classroom and on dealing with students, as well as on matters that affect readers’ careers, such as research, publication, and tenure. The book concludes with a tongue-in-cheek appendix on How to Become a Millionaire while an academic.


Table of Contents:
Foreword 1 to the First Edition by Laurie Richlin
Foreword 2 to the First Edition by Steadman Upham
Introduction

CHAPTER ONE: BASIC CONCEPTS

CHAPTER TWO: THE PhD

CHAPTER THREE: THE DISSERTATION

CHAPTER FOUR: JOB HUNTING

CHAPTER FIVE: TEACHING

CHAPTER SIX: RESEARCH

CHAPTER SEVEN: TENURE

CHAPTER EIGHT: ACADEMIC RANK

CHAPTER NINE: YOUR FINANCIAL LIFE AS AN ACADEMIC

CHAPTER TEN: LIFE AS AN ACADEMIC

CHAPTER ELEVEN: DIVERSITY

CHAPTER TWELVE: ON WRITING

CHAPTER THIRTEEN: ON PUBLISHING

CHAPTER FOURTEEN: PERSONAL CONSIDERATIONS

CHAPTER FIFTEEN: FINAL THOUGHTS

CHAPTER SIXTEEN:CONCLUSION AND ENVOI

APPENDICES
APPENDIX A:MECHANICS OF THE DISSERTATION
APPENDIX B: OUTSIDE INCOME
APPENDIX C:HOW TO BECOME A MILLIONAIRE
APPENDIX D: WRITING HINTS
APPENDIX E: YOUR HEALTH

About the Authors


Reviews & Endorsements:
"What They Didn't Teach You in Graduate School is exactly what it claims to be: a collection of tips and hints that are rarely part of graduate education and yet are essential to survival in academic life, no matter what stage or discipline. Gray and Drew share their experiences teaching, publishing, and navigating institutional bureaucracy in a way that is highly readable and uniquely informative. This book would find a welcome place on any your scholar's shelf."
- Mary Hamner, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
"Authors, Paul Gray and David E. Drew’s (2012) text is a well written, excellent read, that is insightful for those who are in the process of starting their academic career. From the start to finish, they provide the reader with a lot of useful tips to help one be more savvy and keen as an academic. Readers should enjoy this book because it is well organized and structured. Additionally, the chapters and hints are laid out in a way that is easy and pleasurable to read. The authors do a good job of describing terms and breaking larger concepts into smaller sections or over several tips to allow for the reader to get a better grasp of the overall ideas put forth. They also write in a clear, concise and, more importantly, a direct manner. In essence, Gray and Drew do not try to stump you, nor do they try to act as if they are leading experts. Rather, they sincerely convey their thoughts based upon their experiences as professors. The topics covered in this book are essential and useful because they walk you through several stages of what it takes to have a successful academic career, such as ways to complete your dissertation and effectively publish to working through your first job search and colleague relations. That said, if you are considering a career in the professoriate or currently in a PhD program, and would like a few helpful hints please consider reading this text."
- Derrick Gunter , NACADA